Hamilton: We can compete with the top cars

Lewis Hamilton is happy with the fifth place he secured at the 2013 F1 season opener in Melbourne.

“I always like to go forwards rather than backwards, but overall it is a really good step for the team,” Hamilton commented. “It was great. I’m really happy, way better than we ever expected for the first grand prix, so it’s a good place to start.

“We’ve a good platform to work from. The car felt good and I enjoyed every moment. The only thing is we’re going to have to figure out where we lost time to other people.

“I don’t know how they managed to pull away from us so quickly at the start, but we’ll keep pushing and we’ll get there eventually.

“We’ve a good chance to close up because we’ve some good things in the pipeline. I really feel we can compete with those guys.”

However Hamilton is won’t be drawn on whether he thinks the Mercedes is a winning car.

“Only time will tell,” he said. “If we look back maybe some of the guys will feel a bit frustrated we didn’t finish where we started from, or even further forward. But that’s a good feeling to have because we came here not knowing what would happen.”

Commenting on next week’s race in Malaysia Hamilton said, “It’s going to be tough, but hopefully we can have a better race there and get a better result.”

Whitmarsh: I think we should be worried about the pace

McLaren on Friday admitted it is now “worried” about the pace of the new MP4-28 car.

Jenson Button was just ninth in opening practice in Melbourne, before lagging more than two seconds off the pace in the second ninety minute session. Team newcomer Sergio Perez was consistently even slower.

“I think we should be worried about the pace,” team boss Martin Whitmarsh told British broadcaster Sky. “It is a tough day in the office for everyone at the moment, we are lacking grip and there is a lot of head scratching at the moment,” he said.

While most top teams – notably continuing pacesetters Red Bull – simply evolved their 2012 cars for the final season of V8 regulations, McLaren unveiled a radical new car for this year, including novel pull-rod front suspension.

“I think we are still learning and there is a lot we still need to learn about this car,” Whitmarsh added, “but we have struggled frankly to quite understand how it is performing.”

Sporting director Sam Michael likened McLaren’s new struggles to Ferrari’s of early last year, when Fernando Alonso would ultimately go on to challenge for the title.

“By the fourth or fifth race they were there,” he said.

Source:GMM

Hamilton: I needed a change of scenery

Lewis Hamilton has admitted he decided to leave McLaren at the end of last year because “something didn’t feel right”.

The 2008 world champion had been groomed by the Woking based team for F1 stardom from his McLaren-sponsored days in karting, but 2012 was his sixth consecutive season on the grid with the same outfit. Last year, he finished just fourth in the drivers’ standings, despite having what many believed was the very best car in the field at season’s end.

“I was thankful that I had a car in which I was able to compete with Sebastian (Vettel) and co,” he said in an interview with Germany’s Sport Bild. “But maybe I had just been with McLaren for too long.

“Anyway, I realised that I didn’t want to spend the rest of my life there. At Mercedes, everything is new, also the challenge — which is huge. And I’m fine with that. I just needed a change of scenery.”

Source:GMM

Report – active suspension the key to Mercedes’ speed

Specialist publications are reporting a secret of the apparent speed of Mercedes’ new W04 car — a system known in the German squad’s garage as ‘Fric’.

German television RTL is saying it probably stands for ‘front and rear interactive control’, or in other words a type of legal active suspension.

Electronically-active suspension is not allowed, but an hydraulically-controlled layout could be a key to Mercedes’ unmatched pace in the twisty middle sector at the final Barcelona test recently.

Auto Motor und Sport said the Brackley based team has been “tinkering with the system for three years”. The report said Sauber is also now working on a version.

Source:GMM

Grosjean admits to ‘fatigue’ after 2012 season

Romain Grosjean has admitted the 2012 season took its toll.

Banned in Monza and written off as F1’s ‘first lap nutcase’ by Mark Webber, Grosjean admits he was relieved at the end of December, when Lotus decided he should be given another chance for 2013. With a 2013 seat secured, Frenchman Grosjean went on holiday.

“I think it was good to have a break, it did me good,” he told RMC Sport. “I was much more tired than I thought. It’s about realising just how much fatigue has accumulated, and knowing really what a full season of formula one is about, and that it is not so simple,” added Grosjean.

Source:GMM

Whiting: No extra testing for V6 rules debut

F1 teams will make do with a normal test programme early next year, despite the introduction of radical new engine regulations.

Some of the engine suppliers reportedly want either an earlier or an extended winter test period ahead of the 2014 season, as F1 switches from V8 to turbo V6 engines.

But the FIA’s Charlie Whiting is quoted in Melbourne by Russia’s f1news.ru: “We have been talking with the teams, and they do not want to increase the number of test days.”

Meanwhile, the German-language Spox quotes Briton Whiting as saying he is not expecting the outbreak of any new technical controversies, in the wake of the Renault engine mapping and Williams exhaust stories.

But “In the course of a year, you never know what is going to happen,” he smiled.

Source:GMM

Kubica: No F1 comeback any time soon

Robert Kubica is not willing to give up on a future return to Formula One, despite acknowledging he will not be ready for a comeback for some time.

The Pole, whose right arm was almost severed in an early 2011 rallying crash, is returning to full-time action this year with a programme in the second-tier world rally championship.

But he said he would “give everything” to be able to return to his first love; circuit racing.

Kubica, 28, told the Associated Press there are “tiny lights in the tunnel suggesting that – not in a year or two – but I will be able to race in F1 at a good pace”.

Source:GMM